Throughout time, readers have learned many different lessons from their favourite books. In The Chrysalids, John Wyndam used his story to teach his readers valuable, lifelong lessons. He makes it evident to his readers that prejudging certain people is not right. Also, he relates how change is possible, but hard to achieve. More specifically, religion often influences one’s point of view. John Wyndam’s, The Chrysalids was written with a purpose that teaches his readers about discrimination, about how change is possible, and how religion often influences one’s point of view.

A lesson taught by Wyndham in The Chrysalids, is that prejudging certain people is not right. In Chapter nine, Petra uses her telepathic powers to communicate with “the group” when she is in trouble, and reveals that her telepathic powers were not harmful, and did not prove, as many had thought, to be evil. They, instead, saved her life. Rosalind admits to the fact that prejudging is not right when she states that, “None of us could command like that” (pg 84). Similarly, Sophie is sent to live in the Fringes, because of her third toe. She was sent there for the wrong reason, along with others deemed different, on account of the people of Waknuk misjudging human kind. David reveals that prejudging certain people is not right when he defends Sophie in Chapter six saying, “But Sophie isn’t really different—not in any other way” (pg 55). In the beginning of The Chrysalids, Uncle Axel admits to David, in one of their talks that there is no right or wrong way for a person to look; therefore there is no way to judge rightly. Axel illustrates that this is true by saying, “I’m telling you that nobody, nobody really knows what the true image is. They all think they k…

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